Protect against PRRS and PED this Fall and Winter

Porcine Reproductive & Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) and Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) are deadly viruses that threaten swine populations and the industry. Both infections thrive in low temperatures and low humidity, hence the spikes in late fall and early winter.

These highly-contagious viruses are hard to treat and are considered two of the most economically damaging diseases for the pig industry. How damaging? PRRS and PED viruses alone cost the swine industry approximately $644 million annually.

 

What do I stand to lose without PRRS and PED insurance?

The economic impact is substantial and global. There is no cure for PRRS and PED, and the effects of the infections can be devastating including financial losses to the operation from mortality, reduction in weight and reproduction rates, and ultimately reduction in value of a pig.

 

 

How do I know if my herd is PRRS infected?

There are a number of symptoms affected swine will begin to show if they’ve been infected with PRRS. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Lethargy and anorexia
  • Being off feed for 1 to 5 days
  • Reproductive failure in breeding stock, including still births, mummified fetuses and cyanosis of the ear and vulva
  • Respiratory tract illness in young pigs

 

How do I know if my herd is PED infected?

As with PRRS, there are multiple clinical signs that swine display when affected with PED. They include, but are not limited to:

  • Vomiting
  • Acute watery diarrhea with no blood or mucus
  • Dehydration

 

PRRS and PED are serious issues and will affect your livelihood if you are infected without protection. If infection strikes, it’s likely that 100 percent of sows will be affected. There is no better time to consider PRRS/PED insurance and protect your assets against these dangerous viruses.

 

Sources used for this article include:

The Pig Site: http://www.thepigsite.com/pighealth/article/142/porcine-reproductive-and-respiratory-syndrome-prrs/, http://www.thepigsite.com/diseaseinfo/83/porcine-epidemic-diarrhoea-ped/

BMC Veterinary Research: https://veterinaryresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13567-016-0391-4